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Gamma wave

Group 1: Gamma Wave Characteristics and Functions – Gamma waves are detectable by electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography. – They are a common form of neuronal oscillatory […]

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Group 1: Gamma Wave Characteristics and Functions

– Gamma waves are detectable by electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography.
– They are a common form of neuronal oscillatory activity.
– Gamma activity reflects feedforward connections between brain regions.
– Gamma waves may contribute to conscious perception and attention mechanisms.
– Synchronous 40-Hz oscillations are linked to visual consciousness.
– Thalamic wave synchronization influences conscious awareness.
– Gamma waves are associated with solving the binding problem in the brain.

Group 2: Clinical Relevance of Gamma Waves

– Altered gamma wave activity is linked to mood disorders like depression.
– Schizophrenia shows decreased gamma-wave activity.
– Gamma oscillations are present in the majority of seizures in epilepsy.
– Gamma wave abnormalities are observed in Alzheimer’s Disease and Fragile X Syndrome.
– Gamma stimulation shows potential for therapeutic use in neurodegenerative diseases.

Group 3: Meditation and Gamma Waves

– High-amplitude gamma wave synchrony can be self-induced through meditation.
– Tibetan Buddhist monks show increased gamma-band activity during meditation.
– Gamma activity may underpin enhanced consciousness, stress management, and focus associated with meditation.
– Neurobiological mechanisms of gamma synchrony induction are highly plastic.
– There is potential for inducing psychological and biological benefits of meditation through gamma activity.

Group 4: Brain Waves and Frequency Ranges

– Delta wave frequency range: 0.1 – 3Hz.
– Theta wave frequency range: 4 – 7Hz.
– Alpha wave frequency range: 7 (or 8) – 12Hz.
– Beta wave frequency range: 12 – 30Hz.
– Gamma wave frequency range: 32 – 100Hz.
– High-frequency oscillations: frequencies over ~80Hz.

Group 5: Research and Studies on Gamma Waves

– EEG frequencies above 20Hz are contaminated by EMG during paralysis.
– Gamma oscillations are considered a biomarker for major depression.
– Neural synchrony in stochastic resonance correlates with attention and consciousness.
– Delay of cognitive gamma responses is observed in Alzheimer’s disease.
– Abnormal neural oscillations and synchrony are found in schizophrenia.

Gamma wave (Wikipedia)

A gamma wave or gamma rhythm is a pattern of neural oscillation in humans with a frequency between 25 and 140 Hz, the 40 Hz point being of particular interest. Gamma rhythms are correlated with large-scale brain network activity and cognitive phenomena such as working memory, attention, and perceptual grouping, and can be increased in amplitude via meditation or neurostimulation. Altered gamma activity has been observed in many mood and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia.

Gamma waves
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