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Unconsciousness

– Causes of Unconsciousness: – Traumatic brain injury – Brain hypoxia – Severe intoxication with CNS depressants – Severe fatigue or pain – Anesthesia effects […]

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– Causes of Unconsciousness:
– Traumatic brain injury
– Brain hypoxia
– Severe intoxication with CNS depressants
– Severe fatigue or pain
– Anesthesia effects

– Differentiating Unconsciousness:
– Not to be confused with psychoanalytic unconscious
– Altered states of consciousness like sleep or delirium
– Unconsciousness in jurisprudence
– Consideration of excusing conditions in legal cases
– Importance of foreseeability in loss of control

– Legal Implications of Unconsciousness:
– Consent issues when not fully conscious
– Relevance in cases of sexual assault or euthanasia
– Impact on informed consent for medical treatments
– Presumptions in various countries regarding consent
– Acceptable excusing conditions in legal contexts

– Related Topics:
– Coma
– Hypnosis
– Traumatic brain injury
– Fainting (Syncope)
– Trance states

– References and Classification:
– MeSH Browser for further information
– ICD-11 and ICD-10 classifications
– Sources for additional reading
– Categorization in Commons
– Retrieve information from specific sources

Unconsciousness (Wikipedia)

Unconsciousness is a state in which a living individual exhibits a complete, or near-complete, inability to maintain an awareness of self and environment or to respond to any human or environmental stimulus. Unconsciousness may occur as the result of traumatic brain injury, brain hypoxia (inadequate oxygen, possibly due to a brain infarction or cardiac arrest), severe intoxication with drugs that depress the activity of the central nervous system (e.g., alcohol and other hypnotic or sedative drugs), severe fatigue, pain, anaesthesia, and other causes.

Unconsciousness
An unconscious male human lying in a recovery position
SpecialtyPsychiatry
Neurology
Cardiology
Pulmonology

Loss of consciousness should not be confused with the notion of the psychoanalytic unconscious, cognitive processes that take place outside awareness (e.g., implicit cognition), and with altered states of consciousness such as sleep, delirium, hypnosis, and other altered states in which the person responds to stimuli, including trance and psychedelic experiences.

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