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Sleep-talking

Sleep-Talking Causes: – Stress and anxiety – Sleep disorders (e.g., confusional arousals, sleep apnea, REM sleep behavior disorder) – Medications – Alcohol consumption – Genetics […]

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Sleep-Talking Causes:
– Stress and anxiety
– Sleep disorders (e.g., confusional arousals, sleep apnea, REM sleep behavior disorder)
– Medications
– Alcohol consumption
– Genetics

Frequency and Prevalence of Sleep-Talking:
– 5% of adults talk in their sleep
– More common in children (50% reported at least once a year)
– Prevalence varies with around 10% of children talking every night and 20-25% weekly
– Decreases with age
– Can occur multiple times a night
– Episodes can occur in any sleep stage

Effects and Impact of Sleep-Talking:
– Disrupts sleep patterns
– Can be embarrassing
– Can lead to sleep deprivation
– May impact relationships
– Rarely indicates an underlying issue

Treatment and Management of Sleep-Talking:
– Stress management techniques
– Improving sleep hygiene (e.g., limiting caffeine intake, avoiding electronics before bed)
– Avoiding alcohol and caffeine before bed
– Cognitive behavioral therapy
– Behavioral treatments like automated auditory signals
– Medications in severe cases

Relationship Between Sleep-Talking and Other Sleep Disorders:
– Linked to sleepwalking
– Can co-occur with night terrors
– May be a symptom of REM sleep behavior disorder
– Associated with sleep-related eating disorder
– Connected to sleep paralysis

Sleep-talking (Wikipedia)

Somniloquy, commonly referred to as sleep-talking, is a parasomnia in which one speaks aloud while asleep. It can range from simple mumbling sounds to loud shouts or long, frequently inarticulate, speeches. It can occur many times during a sleep cycle and during both NREM and REM sleep stages, though, as with sleepwalking and night terrors, it most commonly occurs during delta-wave NREM sleep or temporary arousals therefrom.

When somniloquy occurs during rapid eye movement sleep, it represents a so-called "motor breakthrough" of dream speech: words spoken in a dream are spoken out loud. Depending on its frequency, this may or may not be considered pathological. All motor functions are disabled during healthy REM sleep and therefore REM somniloquy is usually considered a component of REM behavior disorder.

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