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Sensorimotor rhythm

Meaning: – SMR meaning not fully understood – SMR amplitude stronger during immobility – SMR decreases during motor tasks – SMR often confused with occipital […]

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Meaning:
– SMR meaning not fully understood
– SMR amplitude stronger during immobility
– SMR decreases during motor tasks
– SMR often confused with occipital alpha waves
– Feline SMR similar to human mu rhythm

Relevance in research:
– Neurofeedback training for SMR control
– Benefits for learning difficulties, ADHD, epilepsy, and autism
– SMR neurofeedback enhances golf putting performance
– SMR modification used in Brain-Computer Interfaces
– SMR regulation aids in controlling external applications

See also:
– Electroencephalography for brain electrical activity monitoring
– Brain waves: Delta, Theta, Alpha, Mu, SMR, Beta, Gamma

References:
– Studies on the functional significance of SMR
– Research on the morphological evidence of feline SMR
– Neurofeedback’s effects on cognitive performance
– Neurofeedback treatment for epilepsy
– Positive changes in children with autism after neurofeedback training

Further reading:
– Book on SMR and brain activity
– Studies on EEG correlates of sleep
– Instrumental conditioning of sensorimotor cortex EEG spindles
– Book on consciousness and SMR
– Neurofeedback origins and insights

Sensorimotor rhythm (Wikipedia)

The sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) is a brain wave. It is an oscillatory idle rhythm of synchronized electric brain activity. It appears in spindles in recordings of EEG, MEG, and ECoG over the sensorimotor cortex. For most individuals, the frequency of the SMR is in the range of 7 to 11 Hz.

SMR waves
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