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Rabbinic literature

Mishnaic Literature: – Midrshe halakha, Mishnah, and Tosefta are early works. – Jerusalem Talmud and Babylonian Talmud are major works. – Minor tractates are part […]

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Mishnaic Literature:
– Midrshe halakha, Mishnah, and Tosefta are early works.
– Jerusalem Talmud and Babylonian Talmud are major works.
– Minor tractates are part of the Babylonian Talmud.
– Tel Rehov inscription is an early material witness.
– Earliest Talmudic manuscripts date to the 8th century.

The Midrash:
– Midrash is a method of reading biblical texts.
– Midrashic works span Mishnaic to Geonic times.
– Classical Midrashic works show evidence of reworking.
– Various Midrashic teachings exist in multiple variants.
– Works like Mekhilta and Sifra are part of Midrashic literature.

Mefareshim:
– Mefareshim means commentators in Hebrew.
– Rashi and Tosafot are classical Talmudic commentators.
– Mefareshim comment on Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, and more.
– Rashi’s commentary is followed by Tosafot.
– Modern Torah commentaries have gained acclaim.

Modern Torah Commentaries:
– Haemek Davar by Rabbi Naftali Zvi Yehuda Berlin.
– Chofetz Chaim and Torah Temimah are respected works.
– Kerem HaTzvi by Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch Ferber.
– Sefat Emet by Yehudah Aryeh Leib of Ger.
– Works by Elie Munk, Nosson Scherman, and Jonathan Sacks are notable.

Bibliography:
– “Back to the Sources” by Barry W. Holtz.
– Works by Jacob Neusner and H. L. Strack.
– “The Literature of the Sages” by Shemuel Safrai and Peter J. Tomson.
– Safrai’s contributions to “A History of the Jewish People.”
– Various scholarly works on Rabbinic literature.

External Links:
– Survey of rabbinic literature.
– Timeline of Jewish texts.
– Comprehensive listing by category.
– Judaica archival project.
– Online resources for studying Rabbinic literature.

Rabbinic literature (Wikipedia)

Rabbinic literature, in its broadest sense, is the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history. However, the term often refers specifically to literature from the Talmudic era (70–640 CE), as opposed to medieval and modern rabbinic writings, and thus corresponds with the Hebrew term Sifrut Chazal (Hebrew: ספרות חז״ל "Literature [of our] sages", where Hazal normally refers only to the sages of the Talmudic era). This more specific sense of "Rabbinic literature"—referring to the Talmudim, Midrashim (Hebrew: מדרש), and related writings, but hardly ever to later texts—is how the term is generally intended when used in contemporary academic writing. The terms mefareshim and parshanim (commentaries/commentators) almost always refer to later, post-Talmudic writers of rabbinic glosses on Biblical and Talmudic texts.

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