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Neurophenomenology

– Overview: – Coined by C. Laughlin, J. McManus, and E. dAquili in 1990. – Term redefined by Francisco Varela in the mid-1990s. – Phenomenology […]

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– Overview:
– Coined by C. Laughlin, J. McManus, and E. dAquili in 1990.
– Term redefined by Francisco Varela in the mid-1990s.
– Phenomenology focuses on examining phenomena as they appear to consciousness.
– Neuroscience studies the brain’s third-person aspects of consciousness.
– Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty made significant contributions to phenomenology.

– See also:
– Antonio Damasio and Francisco Varela are notable figures.
– Concepts like autopoiesis and biosemiotics are related.
– Embodied cognition is a key area of interest.
– Hubert Dreyfus and Walter Freeman have influenced the field.
– The integration of neurosciences with embodied ontology is explored.

– References:
– Works by David Rudrauf, Shaun Gallagher, and Charles Laughlin are cited.
– The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy provides valuable resources.
– Books like “The Phenomenological Mind” offer in-depth insights.
– Key publications on neurophenomenology are highlighted.
– Various authors have contributed to the understanding of consciousness.

– Further reading:
– Journals like “The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition” delve into neurophenomenology.
– Works by Bernard Andrieu and Jean Petitot offer perspectives on the topic.

– External links:
– Wikibooks and Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy provide additional resources.
– Links to Francisco Varela’s articles on neurophenomenology are available.
– Websites like neurophenomenology.com offer further exploration opportunities.

Neurophenomenology (Wikipedia)

Neurophenomenology refers to a scientific research program aimed to address the hard problem of consciousness in a pragmatic way. It combines neuroscience with phenomenology in order to study experience, mind, and consciousness with an emphasis on the embodied condition of the human mind. The field is very much linked to fields such as neuropsychology, neuroanthropology and behavioral neuroscience (also known as biopsychology) and the study of phenomenology in psychology.

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