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Neurohistory

– Background: – Neurohistory can be traced back to William Reddys reception of experimental psychology. – Smail introduced neurohistory in his book “On Deep History […]

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– Background:
– Neurohistory can be traced back to William Reddys reception of experimental psychology.
– Smail introduced neurohistory in his book “On Deep History and the Brain.”
– Smail argued that the neurological complex is associated with social practices and institutions.
– Smail proposed extending the chronological bounds of history.
– Other supporters of neurohistory include Lynn Hunt and Dieter Langewiesche/Niels Birbaumer.

– Concept:
– Neurohistory focuses on the brain as a narrative focus of history.
– It recognizes evidence for brain plasticity in human development.
– Neurohistory is linked with cultural history.
– It provides insights into early history without constraining historical imagination.
– It leads to implicit presentism projected from reconstructed context.

– References:
– Leefmann and Hildt’s book “The Human Sciences after the Decade of the Brain.”
– Smail’s book “On Deep History and the Brain.”
– Tileagă and Byford’s book “Psychology and History: Interdisciplinary Explorations.”
– Plamper’s book “The History of Emotions: An Introduction.”
– Tamm and Burke’s book “Debating New Approaches to History.”

– Evolutionary Assumptions:
– Neurohistory relies on evolutionary assumptions.
– It blends exaptation and the Baldwin effect.
– Neurophilosophy ideas can be drawn upon to extend neurohistory.
– The result suggests a new historical method: history from within.
– It is conceived as an augmentation of history from below.

– Methodological Discussion:
– The co-operation between history and neuroscience is discussed.
– Langewiesche and Birbaumer offer reflections on this cooperation.
– Neurohistory offers a new kind of historical method.
– It allows for history from within.
– The methodological discussion enhances the understanding of historical events.

Neurohistory (Wikipedia)

Neurohistory is an interdisciplinary approach to history that leverages advances in neuroscience to tell new kinds of stories about the past, but especially of deep history. This is achieved by incorporating the advances in neurosciences into historiographical theory and methodology in the attempt to reconstruct the past It was first proposed by Harvard professor Daniel Lord Smail in his work and it offers historians a way to engage critically with the implicit folk psychologies in the interpretation of evidence.

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