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Neurocriminology

1. Neurocriminology Overview: – Crime as a social and environmental issue – Focus on analyzing brain conditions – Inclusion of brain tumors, psychoses, sociopathy, and […]

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1. Neurocriminology Overview:

– Crime as a social and environmental issue
– Focus on analyzing brain conditions
– Inclusion of brain tumors, psychoses, sociopathy, and sleepwalking
– Deviant brain theories within biocriminology
– Popularity due to neuroscience advancements

2. Neurocriminology Origins and Major Researchers:

– Traced back to Cesare Lombroso
– Belief in crime stemming from brain abnormalities
– Identification of physical traits in criminals
– Leading researcher Dr. Adrian Raine
– Initiation of brain imaging studies on violent criminals

3. Brain Abnormalities in Offenders:

– Structural and functional brain abnormalities in offenders
– Underdeveloped amygdalae and prefrontal cortex impairments
– Cavum septi pellucidi maldevelopment linked to antisocial behavior
– Increased striatum volume in psychopaths
– Bigger right hippocampus in psychopaths

4. Impact of Brain Damage on Behavior:

– Prefrontal cortex injuries leading to impulsive behavior
– Behavioral changes post-brain injury in cases like P. Gage
– Brain tumors causing behavioral changes as seen in Charles Whitman
– Example of Michael Oft showcasing behavioral changes due to brain tumor growth

5. Legal and Ethical Implications of Neurocriminology:

– Use of brain scans as mitigating evidence in trials
– Cases like Herbert Weinstein and Antonio Bustamante using brain scans for defense
– Brain pathology sparing criminals from the death penalty
– Recognition of biological and environmental factors in behavior
– Discussion on free will within neural networks shaped by genes and environment

Neurocriminology (Wikipedia)

Neurocriminology is an emerging sub-discipline of biocriminology and criminology that applies brain imaging techniques and principles from neuroscience to understand, predict, and prevent crime.

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