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Lutheranism

Historical Development of Lutheranism: – Lutheranism originated in the work of Martin Luther during the Reformation. – It became the state religion in various northern […]

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Historical Development of Lutheranism:
– Lutheranism originated in the work of Martin Luther during the Reformation.
– It became the state religion in various northern European states.
– Lutheranism spread through Scandinavia, Estonia, Latvia, and German-ruled Lithuania Minor in the 16th century.
– Lutheranism faced challenges during the Counter-Reformation, especially in Lithuania.
– The theology of Lutheranism is primarily based on the teachings of Martin Luther.

Spread and Establishment of Lutheranism in Northern Europe:
– Lutheranism spread through Scandinavia, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, with monarchs and nobility adopting the faith.
– Denmark and Sweden officially embraced Lutheranism during the 16th century.
– The Uppsala Synod in Sweden declared Holy Scripture as the sole guideline for faith in 1593.
– Lutheranism played a significant role in shaping the religious landscape of these regions.

Theological Tenets and Doctrines of Lutheranism:
– Lutheranism advocates justification by Grace alone through faith alone on the basis of Scripture alone.
– It retains many liturgical practices and sacramental teachings of the pre-Reformation Western Church.
– Lutheranism emphasizes the Eucharist and differs from Reformed theology in certain theological matters.
– The doctrine of Lutheranism is detailed in the Formula of Concord and emphasizes the authority of Scripture.

Movements and Influences on Lutheranism:
– Various movements like Rationalism, Neo-Lutheranism, and Revivals have shaped the development of Lutheranism.
– Rationalism in the 18th century challenged traditional beliefs, while Neo-Lutheranism aimed to restore doctrine and confessions.
– Revivals in Scandinavia, driven by figures like N. F. S. Grundtvig, emphasized traditional Lutheran values and missions.
– Theological developments at the University of Erlangen and the Lutheran Confessions also influenced the evolution of Lutheranism.

Key Doctrines and Beliefs of Lutheranism:
– Lutherans believe in the authority and inspiration of the Bible as the basis for faith and morals.
– The efficacy and sufficiency of Scripture, the doctrine of justification, the Trinity, and the two natures of Christ are core beliefs in Lutheranism.
– Lutherans uphold the Book of Concord, emphasize salvation through faith in Jesus alone, and worship the Triune God.
– The Lutheran perspective on the clarity of Scripture, the role of the Holy Spirit, and the distinction between Law and Gospel are central to their beliefs.

Lutheranism (Wikipedia)

Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestantism, identifying primarily with the theology of Martin Luther, the 16th-century German monk and reformer whose efforts to reform the theology and practices of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation.

The split between the Lutherans and the Roman Catholics was made public and clear with the 1521 Edict of Worms. The edicts of the Diet condemned Luther and officially banned citizens of the Holy Roman Empire from defending or propagating his ideas, subjecting advocates of Lutheranism to forfeiture of all property, half of the seized property to be forfeited to the imperial government and the remaining half forfeit to the party who brought the accusation.

The divide centered primarily on two points: the proper source of authority in the church, often called the formal principle of the Reformation, and the doctrine of justification, often called the material principle of Lutheran theology. Lutheranism advocates a doctrine of justification "by Grace alone through faith alone on the basis of Scripture alone," the doctrine that scripture is the final authority on all matters of faith. This is in contrast to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, defined at the Council of Trent, concerning final authority coming from both the Scriptures and Tradition.

Unlike Calvinism, Lutheranism retains many of the liturgical practices and sacramental teachings of the pre-Reformation Western Church, with a particular emphasis on the Eucharist, or Lord's Supper, though Eastern Lutheranism uses the Byzantine Rite. Lutheran theology differs from Reformed theology in Christology, divine grace, the purpose of God's Law, the concept of perseverance of the saints, and predestination amongst other matters.


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