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Lectio Divina – Wikipedia

Historical Development of Lectio Divina: – Origen emphasized Christ as the key to interpreting Scripture and viewed it as a sacrament. – Ambrose of Milan […]

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Historical Development of Lectio Divina:
– Origen emphasized Christ as the key to interpreting Scripture and viewed it as a sacrament.
– Ambrose of Milan and Saint Augustine inherited Origen’s methods.
– Desert Fathers in the 4th century influenced early monastic life.
– St. Benedict and Pope Gregory I were key figures in medieval Lectio Divina.
– Saint Bernard of Clairvaux emphasized Lectio Divina in the Cistercian order.

Formalization and Expansion of Lectio Divina:
– Guigo II formalized the four stages of Lectio Divina in the late 12th century.
– The Carmelite Rule of St. Albert prescribed daily pondering on the Word of God.
– St. Dominic de Guzman practiced Lectio Divina in the Dominican order.
– St. John of the Cross in Spain taught the four stages of Lectio Divina.
– Lectio Divina continued to evolve and spread in the 16th century.

Revival and Modern Emphasis on Lectio Divina:
– The Second Vatican Council in 1965 emphasized the use of Lectio Divina.
– Pope Paul VI and Pope Benedict XVI reaffirmed the importance of Lectio Divina.
– Lectio Divina has increased in popularity outside monastic circles since the late 20th century.
– The Anglican Communion also stresses the importance of Lectio Divina.
– The practice of Lectio Divina involves four movements: lectio, meditatio, oratio, contemplatio.

Practice and Components of Lectio Divina:
– Lectio involves reading Scripture attentively.
– Meditatio involves pondering the inner message of Scripture.
– Oratio emphasizes prayer as dialogue with God.
– Contemplatio is a form of silent prayer expressing love for God.
– Methods of meditation and contemplation vary among different Catholic orders.

Influence and References on Lectio Divina:
– Benedictine tradition influenced both Catholics and Protestants in scriptural meditation.
– Reformed adaptations of Lectio Divina were common among Puritans.
– Various authors and publications discuss the benefits of meditative prayer.
– Lectio Divina is used in Anglican and Episcopal churches for spiritual growth.
– Further reading includes works by authors like Basil Pennington and Jean Khoury for a deeper understanding of Lectio Divina.

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