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Lark (person)

– Charting Chronotypes – Till Roenneberg, a chronobiologist in Munich, has mapped the circadian rhythms of over 200,000 individuals. – Circadian rhythms, biological processes with […]

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– Charting Chronotypes
– Till Roenneberg, a chronobiologist in Munich, has mapped the circadian rhythms of over 200,000 individuals.
– Circadian rhythms, biological processes with a 24-hour oscillation, vary from early to late chronotypes.
– Roenneberg calculates chronotypes based on the midpoint of the sleep period, regardless of total sleep hours.
– Early chronotypes struggle to sleep in even after staying up late, impacting social interactions.
– Late chronotypes go to bed and rise late, facing challenges when forced to wake up earlier.

– Prevalence
– A survey of 55,000+ people in 2007 showed a normal distribution of chronotypes, with extreme morning and evening types.
– Genes, such as the Per2 gene on chromosome 2, play a role in determining if someone is a morning or evening person.
– Age influences chronotypes, with teens often being night owls and transitioning to larks later in life.
– Infants typically exhibit early rising tendencies.
– Genetic variants like the Per2 gene can skew sleep patterns despite adequate sleep duration.

– Career Options
– Morning larks excel in careers starting early, such as farming, construction, and public utilities.
– Professions like bakers, teachers, dairy farmers, and surgeons are known for early morning hours.
– Morning larks may find suitable roles in coffee shops, hotels during the morning rush, or morning news shows.
– Evening-oriented industries like restaurants and entertainment venues may have fewer morning lark employees.
– Round-the-clock industries like healthcare and emergency services require staff at all hours, accommodating morning larks.

– See Also
– Advanced sleep phase syndrome
– Circadian rhythm sleep disorder
– Diurnality
– FASPS
– Morningness–eveningness questionnaire (MEQ)

– References
– T, C. (1847). Lessons derived from the animal world. p.269.
– Horne JA, Östberg O (1976). A self-assessment questionnaire to determine morningness-eveningness in human circadian rhythms.
– Roenneberg, Till; Kuehnle, Tim; Juda, Myriam; Kantermann, Thomas; Allebrandt, Karla; Gordijn, Marijke; Merrow, Martha (2007). Epidemiology of the human circadian clock.
– Torpey, Elka (2015). Career Outlook: Careers for night owls and early birds.
– Foster, Russell G.; Kreitzman, Leon (2017). Circadian Rhythms: A Very Short Introduction.

Lark (person) (Wikipedia)

A lark, early bird, morning person, or (in Scandinavian countries) an A-person, is a person who usually gets up early in the morning and goes to bed early in the evening. The term relates to the birds known as larks, which are known to sing before dawn. Human "larks" may sleep from around 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. (or earlier), and tend to feel most energetic just after they get up in the morning. They are thus well-suited for working the day shift.

Early Morning (c. 1858) by Moritz von Schwind

The opposite of the lark is the owl, often awake at night. A person called a night owl is someone who usually stays up late and may feel most awake in the evening and at night. Researchers have traditionally used the terms morningness and eveningness to describe these two chronotypes.

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