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Kavanah

– Discussion: – Kavanah connotes intention and emotional devotionalism during a prayer in Judaism. – Originates from an ancient verbal root related to directing, preparing, […]

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– Discussion:
– Kavanah connotes intention and emotional devotionalism during a prayer in Judaism.
– Originates from an ancient verbal root related to directing, preparing, and establishing an orientation of mind and heart.
– Implies concentration, sincerity, and the essence of prayer expressing a plea to God with belief and meaning.
– Involves both emotional and intellectual devotion, according to Herman Cohen.
– Requires devotional belief in prayer, understanding the words, and genuine intention.

– In Chovot HaLevavot:
– Duties of the Heart by Bahya ibn Paquda categorizes kavanah into three general categories.
– Focuses on duties of the heart alone, combining humility, reverence, love for God, and virtues.
– Includes duties of the body and heart together, such as prayer, Torah study, and praising God.
– Mentions duties of the limbs alone, like observing festivals and performing charitable acts.
– Highlights the importance of directing actions towards God in all duties.

– Kabbalah:
– In Kabbalah, kavanah often refers to the permutations of the divine name to unify forces in the Upper World.

– See also:
– Jewish meditation
– Yichudim (unifications)
– Devekut
– Shaar HaKavanot
– Niyyah, a similar concept in Islam

– External links:
– Halachipedia article

– References:
– Pinchas Giller (2008). Shalom Sharabi and the Kabbalists of Beit El.
– Moshe Halbertal (2013). Maimonides: Life and Thought.
– Eisenberg, Joice; Ellen Scolnic; Jewish Publication Society (2001). The JPS dictionary of Jewish words.
– Jack Cohen (2000). Major Philosophers of Jewish Prayer in the Twentieth Century.
– Buber, Martin (1974). Tales of the Hasidim – The Later Masters.

Kavanah (Wikipedia)

Kavanah, kavvanah or kavana (also pronounced /kaˈvonə/ by some Ashkenazi Jews) (כַּוָּנָה; in Biblical Hebrew kawwānā), plural kavanot or kavanos (Ashkenazim), literally means "intention" or "sincere feeling, direction of the heart". It is the mindset often described as necessary for Jewish rituals (mitzvot) and prayers. Kavanah is a theological concept in Judaism about a worshiper's state of mind and heart, his or her sincerity, devotion and emotional absorption during prayers.

In Hasidic Judaism, a Jewish tradition that emphasizes piety, kavanah is the emotional devotion, self-effaced absorption during prayers rather than a liturgical recitation driven religiosity. In esoteric Jewish mysticism (Kabbalah), kavanah refers to the practice where the devotee concentrates on the secret meanings of prayer letters and words, sometimes referring to the permutations of the divine name. Some kavanot are particular to the tradition of Kabbalah during meditation.

Kavanah has been much debated subject among Judaism scholars, with traditional sources accepting that Jewish rituals without at least minimal kavanah is insufficient. Different Jewish authorities see various levels of kavanah required for various rituals, and especially for prayer. Some prayerbooks (siddurim) list kavanot for particular prayers. Some particular kavanot are associated with particular holidays, for example Sukkot, Pesach, Shavuot, and others.

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