Memorial Day Offer

Discover your mystery discount!

Hypnopompia

– Etymology: – Term hypnopompic coined by Frederic Myers in 1904 – Word-ending pompos originates from Greek word meaning sender – Hallucinations: – Sensory perceptions […]

« Back to Glossary Index

– Etymology:
– Term hypnopompic coined by Frederic Myers in 1904
– Word-ending pompos originates from Greek word meaning sender

– Hallucinations:
– Sensory perceptions occurring without objective stimulus
– Most hallucinations are visual, but can involve broader sensory experiences
– Auditory hallucinations common, ranging from simple sounds to complete sentences
– Somesthetic hallucinations involve touch and location sensations
– Hypnopompic hallucinations unique as sleepers are aware of being awake but mentally trapped

– Neurobiology:
– Two types of sleep: R.E.M. and N.R.E.M.
– R.E.M. sleep characterized by intense brain activity
– N.R.E.M. sleep is deep sleep with minimal brain activity
– Hypnopompic hallucinations caused by brain-stem fragments in N.R.E.M.
– Micro-wake fragments related to serotonin and dopamine deficits

– Cultural manifestations:
– Hypnopompic hallucinations depicted in Fuseli’s painting “The Nightmare”
– Across cultures, hallucinations related to spirits and demons
– Anglo-Saxon traditions associate hypnopompic experiences with the Old Hag
– Yoruban-African diasporas interpret experiences as possession by evil manifestations
– Japanese interpretations known as “kanashibari” involve feeling bound

– Future research horizons:
– Hypnopompic hallucinations similar to those in dementia, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia
– Common neurofunctional substrate identified for schizophrenic delusions and hypnopompic hallucinations
– Shared pattern of brain activation in right parietal-occipital regions
– Research aims to understand neurobiological basis and potentially eliminate painful experiences

Hypnopompia (Wikipedia)

Hypnopompia (also known as hypnopompic state) is the state of consciousness leading out of sleep, a term coined by the psychical researcher Frederic Myers. Its mirror is the hypnagogic state at sleep onset; though often conflated, the two states are not identical and have a different phenomenological character. Hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations are frequently accompanied by sleep paralysis, which is a state wherein one is consciously aware of one's surroundings but unable to move or speak.

« Back to Glossary Index
This site uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. By browsing this website, you agree to our use of cookies.