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Homemaking

Homemaking and Household Responsibilities: – Homemaking involves managing a home, including housework, housekeeping, and household management. – Traditionally, homemaking was primarily the responsibility of women. […]

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Homemaking and Household Responsibilities:
– Homemaking involves managing a home, including housework, housekeeping, and household management.
– Traditionally, homemaking was primarily the responsibility of women.
– Home health workers can assist with homemaking duties for the elderly.
– Housekeeping encompasses tasks like budgeting, meal preparation, cleaning, and property maintenance.
– Cooking involves food preparation using various methods and kitchen appliances.
– Cleaning involves activities like disposing of rubbish, dusting, and vacuuming.
– Laundry involves washing clothing and linens using detergents and various drying methods.
– Maintenance, including predictive and preventive measures, is crucial for household equipment.
– Lawn maintenance practices vary based on seasons and grass types.

Gender Roles and Household Dynamics:
– Studies show that women spend more time on household activities compared to men.
– Unequal distribution of housework is often due to time availability.
– Sharing household chores is considered important for a successful marriage.
– The division of labor within the home promotes a healthy relationship between partners.
– Clutter in households can result from having too many possessions and can be managed through decluttering methods.

Household Management and Purchasing:
– Household management involves overseeing organizational, financial, and day-to-day operations.
– Effective management ensures smooth household operations.
– Homemakers acquire goods and services for the household.
– Factors like natural gas prices can affect purchasing decisions.
– Homemakers handle purchasing power sources for appliances.

Household Production and Work Strategies:
– Household production involves creating goods and services for household consumption.
– Goods produced for household use are not usually included in GDP calculations.
– Work strategies involve decisions on employment, domestic production work, and consumption work.
– Strategies for household work may vary based on age and economic environment.

Servants and Further Reading:
– Homemakers may manage household workers like maids, butlers, and domestic workers.
– Further reading materials provide insights into the historical and sociological aspects of homemaking.
– Sources like textbooks and academic studies offer a deeper understanding of household management and homemaking practices.

Homemaking (Wikipedia)

Homemaking is mainly an American and Canadian term for the management of a home, otherwise known as housework, housekeeping, housewifery or household management. It is the act of overseeing the organizational, day-to-day operations of a house or estate, and the managing of other domestic concerns. A person in charge of the homemaking, who is not employed outside the home, in the US and Canada, is called a homemaker, a term for a housewife or a househusband. Historically the role of homemaker was often assumed by women. The term "homemaker", however, may also refer to a social worker who manages a household during the incapacity of the housewife or househusband. Home health workers assume the role of homemakers when caring for elderly individuals. This includes preparing meals, giving baths, and any duties the person in need cannot perform for themselves.

Good Housekeeping is one of several magazines related to homemaking.
Title page of Our Home Cyclopedia: Cookery and Housekeeping, published in Detroit, Michigan, in 1889

Homemaking can be the full-time responsibility of one spouse, partner, or parent, shared with children or extended family, or shared or traded between spouses/partners as one or both work outside the home. It can also be outsourced partially or completely to paid help. In previous decades, there were a number of mandatory courses for the young to learn the skills of homemaking. In high school, courses included cooking, nutrition, home economics, family and consumer science (FACS), and food and cooking hygiene. [citation needed]

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