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Extended family

Definition and Importance of Extended Family: – Extended family includes relatives beyond the immediate family living together or close by. – Stem family involves parents […]

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Definition and Importance of Extended Family:
– Extended family includes relatives beyond the immediate family living together or close by.
– Stem family involves parents living with one child and their family.
– In some cultures, extended family is synonymous with consanguineous family.
– Extended family groups offer a sense of security and belonging.
– They provide role models for desired behavior and cultural values.
– Extended families form support networks for emotional and financial assistance.
– About 16.1% of Americans live in homes with three or more generations.

Global Perspectives on Extended Families:
– Extended families are common in various cultures worldwide.
– Stem-type extended families are prevalent in Western Europe.
– Family reunions strengthen connections among extended family members.
– Australian Aborigines have family structures that extend beyond the nuclear model.
– Geographical isolation is common for middle-class families, leading to independence among family branches.

Extended Family Systems in Specific Regions:
– The joint family system is prevalent in South Asia, particularly in India.
– A patrilineal joint family consists of multiple generations living together.
– The family is headed by a patriarch who makes decisions for the entire family.
– Family income is pooled to meet the needs of all members.
– The patriarch’s wife often has influence over household matters.

Trends and Challenges in Extended Family Dynamics:
– In the early 20th century, extended kin in households was less common.
– Approximately 2.7 million grandparents were raising their grandchildren in 2009.
– Factors contributing to grandparent-headed households include parental substance abuse.
– Multigenerational households increased from 5 million in 2000 to 6.2 million in 2008.
– Economic hardships contribute to the rise of multigenerational households.

Impact of Extended Families on Society and Legal Implications:
– Extended family traditions are stronger in some cultures like Asian and Catholic countries.
– Extended families provide care for children and support for working parents.
– Multigenerational households are common among certain ethnicities.
– Complex legal issues arise in multigenerational households.
– The Supporting Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Act addresses legal and social challenges.

Extended family (Wikipedia)

An extended family is a family that extends beyond the nuclear family of parents and their children to include aunts, uncles, grandparents, cousins or other relatives, all living nearby or in the same household. Particular forms include the stem and joint families.

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