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Blushing

– Description: – Blushing is distinguished from flushing, which is more intensive and extends over more of the body. – Idiopathic craniofacial erythema is a […]

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– Description:
– Blushing is distinguished from flushing, which is more intensive and extends over more of the body.
– Idiopathic craniofacial erythema is a medical condition where a person blushes strongly with little or no provocation.
– People with social phobia are particularly prone to idiopathic craniofacial erythema.

– Physiology:
– A blush is a reddening of the cheeks and forehead caused by increased capillary blood flow in the skin.
– Blushing can extend to the ears, neck, and upper chest, known as the blush region.
– The blushing region has specific anatomical differences in vessel structure compared to other skin areas.
– Special vasodilation mechanisms are involved in emotional blushing.
– Facial veins in the blush region have unique characteristics that contribute to blushing.

– Psychology:
– Charles Darwin considered blushing as the most peculiar and human of all expressions.
– Blushing communicates emotions like shame, shyness, and modesty to others involuntarily.
– Blushing serves as a signal of awareness, apology, and a desire to make things right.
– Techniques can be used to prevent or reduce blushing, such as those related to the fight/flight response.
– Blushing can be seen as a long-term benefit in social contexts despite short-term discomfort.

– See also:
– Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

– References:
– NHS UK, Inspire Students, and Dictionary.com provide information on blushing.
– The American Academy of Dermatology Journal by Wilkin in 1988 discusses blushing.
– Crozier’s work in “The Psychologist” delves into the psychology of blushing.
– Salzen’s letter in “The Psychologist” explores flushing and blushing.
– Further reading includes books on blushing, social emotions, and overcoming abnormal facial blushing.

Blushing (Wikipedia)

Blushing or erubescence is the reddening of a person's face due to psychological reasons. It is normally involuntary and triggered by emotional stress associated with passion, embarrassment, shyness, fear, anger, or romantic stimulation.

A woman blushing and covering her face.

Severe blushing is common in people who have social anxiety in which the person experiences extreme and persistent anxiety in social and performance situations.

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