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Benedictines

Historical Development of Benedictines: – Founded in 529 by Benedict of Nursia. – Rule of Saint Benedict established autonomy for each community. – Spread of […]

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Historical Development of Benedictines:
– Founded in 529 by Benedict of Nursia.
– Rule of Saint Benedict established autonomy for each community.
– Spread of the Rule in Gaul and Switzerland, displacing earlier codes.
– Monastic scriptoria flourished from the 9th to 12th centuries.
– Influence on various regions like Austria, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Poland, Lithuania, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

Geographical Impact of Benedictines:
– Notable Benedictine monasteries and abbeys in Austria, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Poland, Lithuania, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.
– Introduction and flourishing of Benedictine monasticism in different countries.
– Specific contributions and influences in each region, including foundation years and significant reforms.

Benedictine Organization and Structure:
– Autonomous nature of Benedictine monasticism.
– Each congregation having its own abbot or abbess.
– Specific charisms or devotions within different houses.
– Inclusion in the Benedictine Confederation established in 1893.
– Comparison with other orders following the Rule of Saint Benedict.

Benedictine Life and Values:
– Benedictine vows of stability, conversion of habits, and obedience.
– Authority of abbots and abbesses over community members.
– Importance of communal timetables for prayer, work, and activities.
– Observance of silence during specific hours.
– Customary codes based on the Rule followed by each Benedictine house.

Benedictine Influence and Spirituality:
– Values such as ora et labora, stability, obedience, and conversion of life.
– Influence on literature, art, Gregorian chant, and Western Christian spirituality.
– Spiritual practices emphasizing contemplative prayer, discerning God’s voice, and seeking God in daily life.
– Integration of Benedictine principles into modern society and accessibility to people of all backgrounds.
– Notable Benedictines, their contributions, and the preservation of knowledge and culture.

Benedictines (Wikipedia)

The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict (Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a mainly contemplative monastic religious order of the Catholic Church for men and for women who follow the Rule of Saint Benedict. The male religious are also sometimes called the Black Monks, in reference to the colour of their religious habits, in contrast to other Benedictine orders such as the Olivetans, who wear white. They were founded in 529 by Benedict of Nursia, a 6th-century Italian monk who laid the foundations of Benedictine monasticism through the formulation of his Rule. Benedict's sister, Scholastica, possibly his twin, also became a religious from an early age, but chose to live as a hermit. They retained a close relationship until her death.

Order of Saint Benedict
Ordo Sancti Benedicti
AbbreviationOSB
Formation529; 1495 years ago (529)
FounderBenedict of Nursia
Founded atSubiaco Abbey
TypeCatholic religious order
HeadquartersSant'Anselmo all'Aventino
Members
6,802 (3,419 priests) as of 2020
Gregory Polan, OSB
Main organ
Benedictine Confederation
Parent organization
Catholic Church
Websiteosb.org

Despite being called an order, the Benedictines do not operate under a single hierarchy but are instead organized as a collection of autonomous monasteries and convents, some known as abbeys. The order is represented internationally by the Benedictine Confederation, an organization set up in 1893 to represent the order's shared interests. They do not have a superior general or motherhouse with universal jurisdiction but elect an Abbot Primate to represent themselves to the Vatican and to the world.

Benedictine nuns are given the title Dame in preference to Sister.

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