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Alpha wave

1. Alpha Wave Basics: – Alpha waves are neural oscillations in the 8–12 Hz frequency range. – Detected through methods like EEG or MEG. – […]

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1. Alpha Wave Basics:
– Alpha waves are neural oscillations in the 8–12 Hz frequency range.
– Detected through methods like EEG or MEG.
– Predominantly recorded from the occipital lobes during wakeful relaxation with closed eyes.
– Historically thought to represent activity of the visual cortex in an idle state.
– Two forms of alpha waves may have different functions in the wake-sleep cycle.
– Alpha waves begin appearing around four months and mature by age 3.

2. Alpha Wave Effects and Applications:
– Mindfulness meditation can increase alpha wave power.
– Alpha waves can predict mistakes with increased brain wave activity before errors.
– Alpha activity indicates temporary shutdown of visual processing in the primary visual cortex.
– Entrainment at individual brain rhythm accelerates perceptual visual learning.
– Alpha wave biofeedback has shown success in seizure suppression and depression treatment.

3. Alpha Wave Research and Studies:
– Studies on alpha-band oscillations and their role in attention.
– Research on alpha frequency increases due to tobacco smoking.
– Investigation of alpha sleep patterns in conditions like fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue.
– Brain wave patterns predicting errors in tasks.
– Individualized brainwave entrainment enhancing learning and decision-making.

4. Historical Perspective and Discoveries:
– Alpha waves discovered by German neurologist Hans Berger.
– Berger confirmed electrical activity in the human brain.
– Alpha waves gained recognition in the 1960s and 1970s with biofeedback theory.
– Research on the generation and propagation of the human alpha rhythm.
– Advancements in understanding brain wave modulation through mindfulness and meditation.

5. Brain-Machine Interface and Innovations:
– EEG alpha rhythm used in a brain-computer interface experiment in 1988.
– Alpha waves have been used in brain-computer interfaces for controlling physical objects.
– Development of brain-machine interfaces for neuroprostheses and neurorehabilitation.
– Integration of brainwave entrainment in boosting learning outcomes.
– Evolution of brain-machine interfaces for various medical and cognitive applications.

Alpha wave (Wikipedia)

Alpha waves, or the alpha rhythm, are neural oscillations in the frequency range of 8–12 Hz likely originating from the synchronous and coherent (in phase or constructive) electrical activity of thalamic pacemaker cells in humans. Historically, they are also called "Berger's waves" after Hans Berger, who first described them when he invented the EEG in 1924.

Alpha waves

Alpha waves are one type of brain waves detected by electrophysiological and closely related methods, such as by electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG), and can be quantified using quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG). They can be predominantly recorded from the occipital lobes during wakeful relaxation with closed eyes and were the earliest brain rhythm recorded in humans. Alpha waves are reduced with open eyes and sleep, while they are enhanced during drowsiness. Occipital alpha waves during periods of eyes closed are the strongest EEG brain signals.

Historically, alpha waves were thought to represent the activity of the visual cortex in an idle state. More recently, research suggests that they inhibit areas of the cortex not in use, or alternatively that they play an active role in network coordination and communication. Whether they are inhibitory or play an active role in attention links to their direction of propagation, with top-down rearward waves being inhibitory, and forward bottom-up ones aiding visual attentional processes.

An alpha-like variant called a mu wave can be found over the primary motor cortex.[citation needed]

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